How to Google yourself – an infographic

I previously posted a really helpful infographic on how to use Google effectively to find information, and the creators of that one have just put up a new one, titled ‘The Google Yourself Challenge’. I’m sure we’ve all at one time or another guiltily probed the internet with our own name in order to see what’s out there, but managing our online identity is something we should all take seriously these days, particularly if we’re looking for a job or applying for post-graduate positions, and it can be really helpful to see what’s out there about yourself. You can see the original page with the infographic here but I’ve also reproduced it below (clicky for bigness):

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About Matt Wall

I do brains. BRAINZZZZ.

Posted on August 2, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 7 Comments.

  1. This is very intersting! A lot of us don’t realise that once something is put online, you can’t not delete them in Google memory. As a researcher, it reflect on our online presence!

  2. Thanks for sharing this. I tried to clean up my online presence a few months ago, but I forget to maintain it sometimes. Happy to report that LinkedIn, Twitter, and my blog posts take up most of the first page on Google. It’s helpful to have reminders.

  3. Thanks for sharing this! definitely useful to know (:

  1. Pingback: How to Google yourself – an infographic | Fairy tales, Folklore, and Myths | Scoop.it

  2. Pingback: How to Google yourself – an infographic | Edu-search | Scoop.it

  3. Pingback: How to Google yourself - an infographic | Edu-s...

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